Indie News

Emilia Clarke Says Ron Howard ‘Saved’ ‘Solo: A Star Wars Story’

Emilia Clarke Says Ron Howard ‘Saved’ ‘Solo: A Star Wars Story’
Other than Phil Lord and Chris Miller, everyone involved with “Solo: A Star Wars Story” seems pretty happy that Ron Howard ended up directing the film. That includes Emilia Clarke, who says the Oscar-winning filmmaker “saved” the production in her Vanity Fair cover story: “All hail to Kathy [Kennedy] for hiring Ron.”

She also includes what may be a subtle dig at her former directors: “I struggled with Qi’ra quite a lot,” Clarke says of her character. “I was like: ‘Y’all need to stop telling me that she’s ‘film noir,’ because that ain’t a note.’” One might reasonably assume that the “y’all” in question are Lord and Miller.

“When it comes to that amount of money, you’re almost waiting for that to happen,” Clarke adds of what went down. “Money fucks us all up, doesn’t it? There’s so much pressure. Han Solo is a really beloved character.
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Ashley Judd Calls Harvey Weinstein’s Arrest a ‘Watershed Event’ for the #MeToo Era

Ashley Judd Calls Harvey Weinstein’s Arrest a ‘Watershed Event’ for the #MeToo Era
Ashley Judd, one of the first women to publicly accuse Harvey Weinstein of sexual harassment, has called his arrest both “resoundingly significant” and “a watershed event.” Judd sued Weinstein for sexual harassment and defamation earlier this month, alleging that he referred to her as “a nightmare” to work with and prevented her from being cast in Peter Jackson’s “Lord of the Rings” trilogy.

“That Harvey Weinstein, a powerful man who thrived and flourished as he shattered and abused women in a culture of impunity was arrested and charged is resoundingly significant,” Judd wrote in a pair of tweets.

“It is a watershed event, an irreversible pivot away from tacit and explicit license to exploit to clarity about unacceptable behavior no longer being tolerated. Today, these images of Harvey in handcuffs are possible because of the voices, backbone, & determination, in spite of the unknown & retaliation, demonstrated by survivors & the journalists who reported our stories.
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Paz de la Huerta ‘Couldn’t Stop Crying’ After Harvey Weinstein Was Arrested Yesterday

Paz de la Huerta ‘Couldn’t Stop Crying’ After Harvey Weinstein Was Arrested Yesterday
Paz de la Huerta, who has accused Harvey Weinstein of raping her twice in 2010, had an understandably emotional reaction to news of the disgraced former mogul’s arrest yesterday: tears. “I just felt extremely emotional today,” the actress tells Vanity Fair in an interview. “I couldn’t stop crying. I don’t know why. It should be a day of celebration, but I feel melancholic about it all.”

De la Huerta currently lives in France, but plans to return to New York in order to be interviewed by prosecutors. “Anything that will put him in jail will make me happy, but it’s important to me that my voice is heard. I’m happy we’re closer to justice. But I feel my case is being overlooked and not taken as seriously, and that upsets me,” she adds.

“It’s complicated. Part of me is very happy, and part of me is sad.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘O Brother, Where Art Thou’ And The Road To Redemption

The Coen Brothers film, “O Brother, Where Art Thou,” is heavily influenced by Homer’s “The Odyssey.” It is a story rife with moral conflict for both the characters to traverse and the audience, in turn, to justify and empathize. With both works existing in a time of changes, symbols and characters are borrowed and reimagined for the Coens to build upon. The path audiences are lead down is one of winding, ambiguous principles to the final destination of redemption.
See full article at The Playlist »

‘The Happytime Murders’: ‘Sesame Street’ Sues Production Company for Using Its Name in Marketing Campaign

Can you tell me how to get, how to get to court? Stx might be asking that question, as the production company is being sued by the makers of “Sesame Street” over “The Happytime Murders.” Melissa McCarthy stars in the comedy, which Brian Henson is directing and which takes a considerably more irreverent look at Muppets than most viewers are used to.

“Sesame has demanded that Defendants simply drop the references to Sesame Street from ‘The Happytime Murders’ marketing materials – a relatively small burden compared to the devastating and irreparable injury Defendants are causing,” reads a complaint filed yesterday by Sesame Workshop. “But Defendants have refused, and the confusion and tarnishment are building, as evidenced in numerous social media postings.”

The Happytime Murders” makes no secret of the similarities, including the tagline “No Sesame, All Street.”

The complaint continues, “The promotion of ‘The Happytime Murders’ should succeed or fail on its own merits,
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Less Is More: The Style And Works of Director Robert Bresson

Various elements must be measured properly in order to procure the correct style and imagery of a film. Time, focus, and information are components which director Robert Bresson did not trifle with through his career in cinema. Originally beginning as a painter, Bresson’s adherence to detail and style throughout his work is palpable if not colorful. Mastering audience engagement, Bresson’s work is never loud or on the scale of grandiose. He offers a sense of realism within the diegetic space of his films.
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‘The Expanse’ Has Been Saved by Amazon

‘The Expanse’ Has Been Saved by Amazon
Brooklyn Nine-Nine” isn’t the only show to be saved after getting axed this month: Amazon has stepped in to pick up “The Expanse” for a fourth season following its cancelation by Syfy. In a statement announcing the news, Andrew Kosove and Broderick Johnson of Alcon Entertainment expressed their gratitude for “the staggering outpouring of support from the most creative, hardest working sci-fi fans around the world.”

Here’s their full statement:

“We couldn’t be more excited that The Expanse is going to continue on Amazon Prime! We are deeply grateful that Jeff Bezos, Jen Salke, and their team at Amazon have shown such faith in our show. We also want to thank Laura Lancaster, head of Alcon Television for her tireless efforts. We are fully aware that this wouldn’t have been possible if it wasn’t for the staggering outpouring of support from the most creative, hardest
See full article at Indiewire »

Morgan Freeman: ‘I Did Not Assault Women’

Morgan Freeman: ‘I Did Not Assault Women’
Morgan Freeman has released a second statement after being accused of sexual harassment. The Oscar-winning actor, whom eight different women accused of inappropriate comments and/or touching, says he’s “devastated” that his entire life is “at risk of being undermined” and admits that he sometimes pays “light-hearted and humorous” compliments to women. That said, Freeman is also adamant that he “did not assault women.”

Here’s his full statement:

“I am devastated that 80 years of my life is at risk of being undermined, in the blink of an eye, by Thursday’s media reports.

“All victims of assault and harassment deserve to be heard. And we need to listen to them. But it is not right to equate horrific incidents of sexual assault with misplaced compliments or humor.

“I admit that I am someone who feels a need to try to make women–and men–feel appreciated and at ease around me.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Solo: A Star Wars Story’: The Cut Cameo You Won’t See In Ron Howard’s Finished Film

‘Solo: A Star Wars Story’: The Cut Cameo You Won’t See In Ron Howard’s Finished Film
[Editor’s note: The following contains very light spoilers for “Solo: A Star Wars Story.”]

The final cut of Ron Howard’s “Solo: A Star Wars Story” stays mostly true to the script penned by franchise regular Lawrence Kasdan and his son Jonathan, but it is missing at least one compelling scene, complete with an unexpected cameo. Asked by IndieWire in a recent interview how much of their screenplay made it to the big screen, and Lawrence Kasdan estimated about “90 percent,” though that still means that some of their original script was left on the cutting room floor.

That includes at least one scene from the first act of the film, which follows Han Solo (Alden Ehrenreich) during his early years, including a look at his young life on Corellia and his stint in the Imperial Navy. The film doesn’t show much of Han’s enlisted time, instead picking up after he’s been in the armed forces for
See full article at Indiewire »

What Makes L3-37 The Secret Weapon Of ‘Solo: A Star Wars Story’

Spoilers for L3-37 in ‘Solo.’ At the press conference for “Solo: A Star Wars Story,” in a cavernous room in the Pasadena Convention Center, Phoebe Waller-Bridge, the incredible “Fleabag” writer/producer/actress detailed the history of her character – a sentient, sassy droid named L3-37. L3 is one of the standout characters of “Solo;” she’s the faithful companion of a young Lando Calrissian (Donald Glover), who feels just at home copiloting the Millennium Falcon as she does starting a robot revolution.
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Vocal Control In Paul Thomas Anderson’s ‘There Will Be Blood’

From the Classic Hollywood period, celebrated actors like John Wayne and Humphrey Bogart had one trait that was undeniable and lead to impersonations and parodies alike: their voices. Since the passing of the classical period in film, the rise of chameleon actors has gained huge momentum with actors becoming a character to the point of vocal alteration. Actors and directors are now using voice as a means to tell their story, creating dimensional characters, and providing memorable performances.
See full article at The Playlist »

‘Solo: A Star Wars’ Screenwriters Discuss Why They Included The Shocking [Spoiler] Cameo

Spoilers, spoilers, spoilers. Do not read this piece until you’ve seen “Solo: A Star Wars Story.”

Lucasfilm’s “Solo: A Star Wars Story” is in theaters this weekend and its causing people to argue and over “Star Wars” movies all over again. Directed by Ron Howard, the movie’s been met with an enthusiastic to lukewarm response, depending on who you are.
See full article at The Playlist »

These Are the 100 Most-Watched TV Shows of the 2017-18 Season: Winners and Losers

  • Indiewire
If there was a recurring theme during the recent broadcast network upfronts, it was this: Ratings must die. “We are in a new era of media and it’s time to retire the Nielsen television metric,” Turner president David Levy said. “While it undoubtedly served its purpose, it no longer fully captures how to successfully measure an audience in today’s landscape.”

Of course, complaining about Nielsen and traditional ratings is nothing new. And these days, virtually every outlet has embraced its own version of multi-platform program measurement — including TV, DVR, VOD and streaming viewership. Levy pointed to audience targeting and other methods as better ways of selling their wares. At the NBCUniversal upfront, ad sales chairman Linda Yaccarino pushed the company’s new “CFlight” metric.

“I still cannot believe I have to get up this stage and talk about legacy measurement,” Yaccarino said, dismissing the current “C3” standard (which
See full article at Indiewire »

The 25 Best Episodes of ‘Arrested Development,’ Ranked

Even before this month’s surprise drop of a Season 4 Remix on Netflix, it would have been near impossible to rank every “Arrested Development.” (Our hooks off to those sites that have.) Some installments take much different paths to the series’ most satisfying moments, so it’s difficult to put into context whether the show’s more intricately plotted episodes are.

The episodes that would take up the bottom of a full ranking still have their moments. But far more satisfying than figuring out the middling installments on the low end of the show’s quality, we thought we’d highlight the best the show had to offer.

One thing you won’t see on this list: the Season 4 remix. Though an admirable experiment, we opted to use the episodes as originally intended. Still by volume and by proportion of legendary episodes, most of these are from the show’s initial three-season run,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Picnic at Hanging Rock’ Review: Overlong and Overplotted, Amazon’s Gorgeous Adaptation Can’t Recapture the Magic

Joan Lindsay’s novel “Picnic at Hanging Rock” was a mere 212 pages when first printed in 1967. Peter Weir’s 1975 movie of the same name clocked in under two hours (115 minutes). Both have been praised for their mysterious takes on the story of four women who disappear in the Australian bush — the novel for framing the events as a true story (it wasn’t) and the film for its challenging, open-ended conclusion, among other attributes for both.

The new TV adaptation builds on many of these same traits, but a funny thing happens when you try to elongate a surreal horror story by providing explicit details: It gets boring. In extending the length to a six-hour limited series, Amazon’s 2018 version loses much of the original works’ imaginative appeal even while providing added agency to its characters. Each of the key students at Mrs. Hester Appleyard’s (Natalie Dormer) school (as
See full article at Indiewire »

Movie Poster of the Week: The American Posters of Chang Cheh

Above: Seven Blows of the Dragon aka The Water Margin.Known as “The Godfather of Hong Kong cinema,” Chang Cheh (1923-2002), who directed nearly 100 films between the late 50s and the early 90s, is currently the subject of a week-long, 14-film retrospective at the Quad Cinema in New York, co-presented by the New York Asian Film Festival. You can read about Chang in depth in Sean Gilman’s Notebook article “Chang Cheh: Death and Glory,” but here is the Quad’s introduction:As the storied Shaw Brothers began to transform the Hong Kong film industry in the 1950s, a new golden age was on the horizon. At the vanguard of it was director Chang Cheh. The martial arts action in his movies was awe-inspiring—and so too was his career. “Prolific” barely does justice to a director who averaged a half-dozen movies annually during the 1970s boom. He was first and
See full article at MUBI »

George Takei Accuser Changes Story, Now Says Their Encounter Was ‘Not Painful’ and ‘Didn’t Scar’ Him

Scott Brunton, who last year accused “Star Trek” actor George Takei of drugging and sexually assaulting him in 1981, has changed several details of his story in a new interview with the Observer. The former model now says he doesn’t remember any inappropriate touching and, upon being presented with the opinions of two toxicologists who ruled out the spiked-drink scenario, says this makes Takei “a little less sinister.”

In the Observer’s words, Brunton “walk[ed] back key details and let slip that, in his effort to be listened to, he’d fabricated some things. This and other evidence would indicate a hard-to-swallow conclusion: We — both public and press — got the George Takei assault story wrong.”

Brunton admitted that a coffee meeting he previously said he’d had with Takei never took place; he also referred to his encounter with Takei as a “great party story” that he’s told “maybe 20 times,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Whitney’: Kevin MacDonald Delivers A Moving Portrait Of A Tragic Icon [Cannes Review]

Our morbid fascination with rise and fall narratives is entrenched in the culture and all-too-common tragic stories about stardom and pop figures practically beg for cross-examined relitigation. The sad tale of pop R&B icon Whitney Houston is no different and the cultural mourning is still being processed through film and TV. Houston’s story has already yielded 2015’s TV movie “Whitney” and one documentary, “Whitney: Can I Be Me,” made all of just one year ago.
See full article at The Playlist »

Never Forget Han Solo’s Biggest Naysayer Used To Be Harrison Ford

Welcome to #FlashbackFriday, where we look at past moments with filmmakers, actors, etc. and highlight something in cinema history that’s fascinating, amusing, perhaps something you never knew or have seen, you name it.

After what seems like an eternity of reporting about behind-the-scenes drama, “Solo: A Star Wars Story” is finally being released worldwide this weekend. And what better way to celebrate than to hear from one of the biggest naysayers of a Han Solo spin-off film – Harrison Ford?
See full article at The Playlist »

’13 Reasons Why’ vs. ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’: The Show’s Kubrick Jabs Are More Authentic Than You Know

One of the bigger (and least tragic) surprises of Netflix’s dark teen drama “13 Reasons Why” Season 2 was all about the past: Specifically, the summer before Hannah (Katherine Langford) died by suicide. While in Season 1, we learned Hannah’s romantic history was a rough one, Season 2 Episode 6, “The Smile at the End of the Dock,” was all about how she lost her virginity… to sensitive jock Zach (Ross Butler).

Like many relationships, Zach and Hannah’s relationship was aided and abetted on a common interest: movies. Specifically, the movies being shown by the local theater where Hannah worked, which emphasized revivals and classic films over new releases.

Zach, we see in this episode, makes his initial attempts to get closer to Hannah by even going to movies he might not like, such as Stanley Kubrick’s seminal “2001: A Space Odyssey.” This led to arguably one of the funniest scenes in the series,
See full article at Indiewire »
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